In the span of a month, rapper Post Malone has dodged three fatal incidents: a fluky airplane ride, a car crash, and an armed burglary.

“God must hate me,” the “Rockstar” singer tweeted on September 7, just after his Rolls Royce was totaled (though the fact that he had a Rolls Royce to begin with may disprove that theory…).

So, what’s causing Malone’s series of unfortunate events? According to paranormal investigator and Ghost Adventures star Zak Bagans, it’s a Yiddish ghost.

Back in June, months before things got weird, Malone and Bagans toured Bagans’ haunted museum in Las Vegas. The pair visited the room that housed a dybbuk box, which is said to be haunted by a malicious spirit.

After chugging a few beers, Bagans decided to lift the protective case off the box for the first time. In a TMZ video, Malone is totally spooked and touches Bagans’ shoulder to entice him to leave the room. At that exact moment, Bagans touches the box, which is what he believes to have triggered a curse. The ghost adventurer explained that the touch was enough to cast an evil spirit on Malone.

But, what exactly is a dybbuk box?

A dybbuk is a Yiddish word to describe a malicious, restless spirit that can haunt or possess the living.

The dybbuk box is a term used by Kevin Mannis in 2003 to describe a Holocaust survivor’s wine cabinet he was auctioning off on eBay. Mannis purchased the cabinet at an estate sale, after hearing it supposedly had a dybbuk trapped inside. After experiencing his own horrific paranormal experiences while owning the box, he donated it to Bagans’ haunted museum. This is the same box that inspired the 2012 movie Possession.

But is it real?

“It’s probably fake,” said one woman with a PhD in Jewish studies who called into the “Who? Weekly” podcast that was discussing this wild tale.

Sorry to break it to you, Post Malone, but chances are you’re not haunted by a Yiddish spirit. You probably just forgot to forward a chain message back in 2003 and it’s catching up to you now.

Arielle Kaplan

Arielle Kaplan is an Editorial Fellow at Alma.